Cat behavior: Love Hurts! When your cat says “FANGS for the new home!”

Cat bites hand

We’ve all seen examples of the “perfect” cat, who will curl up with you on the couch and let you pet and brush him for hours, and who sleeps peacefully at the foot of your bed all night long.

In reality, cats are individuals just like their humans, and they have their own ideas about… well, just about everything!

One of our fabulous recent cat adopters has a question about their new family member’s “biting” behavior:

…how can we keep her from biting when she gets overly excited. At night when we are sleeping she will jump up and bite our hands to wake us up to pet her, or if she’s sitting by us and we are petting her, she gets so excited that she will randomly attack our hand… why does she do this and how can we make her stop?

There are two separate issues at . . . → Read More: Cat behavior: Love Hurts! When your cat says “FANGS for the new home!”

 

Bringing Home Your New Cat

Happy at home

Welcome home

One key to making successful shelter cat placements is managing the expectations of their new people. Here is some information, gleaned from various websites and the personal experiences of our adopters and volunteers, which we like to share with each cat adopter before the day they bring their new family member home. Have other ideas to help make the transition easier? Send us a comment below! You can never have too much good advice.

Welcome home!

Finding the cat of your dreams may have been easy, but fitting a new feline friend into your household usually requires a little patience and time.

To make your cat’s transition as comfortable as possible, we recommend placing her in a quiet, closed-in area such as a bedroom or a small room away from the main foot traffic and other pets, . . . → Read More: Bringing Home Your New Cat

 

Bringing Home Your New Dog

LighteningFrost

Yay, a new toy!

One key to making successful shelter dog placements is managing the expectations of their new people. Here is some information, gleaned from various websites and the personal experiences of our adopters and volunteers, which we like to share with each dog adopter before the day they bring their new family member home. Have other ideas to help make the transition easier? Send us a comment below! You can never have too much good advice.

Welcome home!

Finding the dog of your dreams may have been easy, but fitting a new canine friend into your household usually requires a little patience and time.

To make your dog’s transition as comfortable as possible, we recommend keeping your new dog on a leash or at your side at first.  Show him where his water and food dish are kept. . . . → Read More: Bringing Home Your New Dog

 

Single Kitten Syndrome – yoo haz it?

Kiki-Ko

Crazy Kitteh

Kittens are like hyper-wound balls of energy, and work off their energy best when having another animal to play with. Two kittens around the same age do well together because they are both at the same stage of development, and both want to POUNCE and TUSSLE and ROLL and RACE AROUND.

In the absence of a second kitten, one kitten will turn their attentions either to another animal in the house – and hopefully that animal will enjoy the activity – OR in the absence of a responsive animal, will turn their attentions to their people and surroundings.

When I was 8 I begged and begged my parents for this one fabulous kitten… they relented, and I had my first Maine Coon, wow! He was an awesome cat and lived for 24 years, BUT his kittenhood in a . . . → Read More: Single Kitten Syndrome – yoo haz it?

 

Underweight Pets

Oatmealintake

Underfed Oatmeal at her January 15, 2011, arrival at the shelter.

If your pet looks like this, make sure that you’re feeding them enough; check the package on their food and make sure that you’re meeting or exceeding the feeding recommendations. If you are, check with your veterinarian: weight loss can be caused by parasites, thyroid disorders, diabetes, and other serious but treatable conditions.

Oatmeal on January 23, 2011, after gaining weight from proper feeding at the shelter.

Since her arrival at the shelter, Oatmeal has filled out nicely and has been adopted!

 

Ringworm

Ringworm

Note: This blog was mistakenly blogged before the blog was to be blogged in our blog. If you read this blog before 5:30 PM PST on November 15, 2010, note that some information in this blog was changed at that time and reblogged.

You’ll sometimes hear people talking about pets – or themselves – contracting “ringworm.” With such an ominous-sounding name, it must be bad, right?

Here’s a little quiz. Don’t worry, it won’t count toward your final grade. Which of these is ringworm most closely related to? A. Common cold B. Tapeworm C. Mushroom D. Earthworm

If you answered A, understand that ringworm isn’t a virus, and it can be treated in many ways, unlike the common cold, to which the only remedy is chicken-noodle soup. If you answered B, you’re on the right track, but ringworm isn’t a parasite in the usual sense, and it isn’t deadly. . . . → Read More: Ringworm